10. The Spiritual Life of a Settlement (and Mission): Charles Fudge Andrews

Charles Fudge Andrews was the second warden at Pembroke House. The life of the warden is revealed through his autobiography. In Charles Fudge Andrew’s day, Pembroke House was a mission, and the new warden was preparing to be a missionary in India. His predecessor had been signed off due to ill-health and stress. Walworth life…

9. La Vie Associative

Mark Smith’s paper explores the informal learning that comes from association, from the coming together in clubs, committees and associations within civil society. The French describe this as La vie associative, the life of the associations or the associative life. The potential of this idea is given a lot of weight by Konrad Elsdon’s survey…

8. Movements

The settlement movement was one of a raft of reforming efforts emerging in Victorian times in response to urban disadvantage. The following ngrams indicate how much was written over time about each. The settlement movement has had relatively small but continuous attention on a scale akin to the drive for garden cities. The catalysts for…

7. Missions and Settlements in Southwark

The idea of missions and settlements caught fire. Cambridge colleges headed south of the river. As the following map, drawn in the first part of the 20th Century shows, Pembroke House was just one of a dozen missions, mostly congregated in Southwark. https://www.queens.cam.ac.uk/visiting-the-college/history/college-facts/queens-house-mission Charles Booth’s poverty map shows four missions in the Walworth area, Charterhouse…

6. The Catalysts

There was a contagion. The idea of missions in disadvantaged communities spread across Oxford, Cambridge and through the public schools. The colleges and schools were primarily drawn to London. The Oxford colleges headed to the East End. The Cambridge colleges looked south of the river. The public school missions distributed across the capital. Diagram built…

4. The Barnett Speech. Settlements of University Men in Great Towns

Samuel Barnett was vicar of St Jude’s Church in Whitechapel. He and his wife Henrietta developed the idea of a settlement, in his words a form of university extension, in her words a place ‘to learn as much as to teach, to receive as much as to give’. Barnett outlined the idea in a lecture…

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